Troop 33 Handbook: Advancement


Joining Requirements

These requirements must be met to join Troop 33.

  1. Complete the fifth grade, or be 11 years old, or have earned the Arrow of Light Award, but be younger than 18 years old.
  2. Submit a completed Boy Scout application and health history signed by your parent or guardian. SEE QUICK START FORM INSIDE FRONT COVER.
  3. Repeat the Pledge of Allegiance (page 468 of the Boy Scout Handbook).
  4. Demonstrate the Scout sign, salute, and handclasp (pages 564-565).
  5. Demonstrate tying the square knot (joining knot) (pages 132-133).
  6. Understand and agree to live by the Scout Oath or promise, Law, motto, and slogan, and the Outdoor Code (pages 5-9, 55).
  7. Describe the Scout badge (page 565).
  8. With your parent or guardian, complete the exercises in the pamphlet "How to Protect Your Children from Child Abuse and Drug Abuse."
  9. Participate in a Scoutmaster conference.
  10. With only a few key exceptions, a parent may not sign-off for their own child's advancements.  Please consult with Dave Moore before doing so.

Rank Advancement

Scouting uses a self-paced advancement program, in which each Scout has the opportunity to advance through five ranks to the sixth, and highest rank, the rank of Eagle Scout. Details of the requirements that must be met to satisfy each of the ranks of Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, Life and Eagle ranks can be found in the Boy Scout Handbook, and are also listed in this Troop Handbook. A Scout can check his advancement status through the postings on the Troop web site or by consulting with the Advancement Chairman.

Every Scout should take his handbook to every meeting, campout, swim, and service project, or other activity where he might pass some thing. If a requirement doesn't get signed off as soon as it is passed, it may be forgotten, at which point the Scout will have to do that requirement again.

A Scout should follow these procedures for obtaining and recording his rank advancements:

  1. Meet the requirements for the advancement or award, including the Scoutmaster's Conference and Board of Review, as set forth in the Boy Scout Handbook.
  2. Have your Scout Handbook signed by the appropriate adult leader(s).
  3. Show your Scout Handbook or other advancement/award paperwork to the Advancement Chairman. It is A SCOUT'S RESPONSIBILITY to show his completed advancement or award paperwork to the Advancement Chairman. A Scout should not depend on his parent or anyone else to do this for him. If the Advancement Chairman does not have your rank advancement or award posted to the his/her records you have not yet earned the advancement or award. Remember, each Scout is responsible for showing his completed paperwork to the Advancement Chairman!!!

A Scout's advancement is recorded in his Boy Scout Handbook (pages 438-447). A Scout is responsible for asking the Scoutmaster or his assistants to sign his handbook as soon as he completes any requirement. SCOUTS SHOULD SAFEGUARD THEIR HANDBOOK BY CLEARLY MARKING THEIR NAME ON THE OUTSIDE EDGE AND PROTECTING IT FROM "THE ELEMENTS". REMEMBER, ALL HANDBOOKS LOOK ALIKE FROM THE OUTSIDE!

Note that the BSA modified certain of the requirements for achieving the Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, Life, and Eagle ranks. The new requirements are reflected below. The changes are effective January 1, 1999, but there was a transition period from January 1-April1, 1999. All new rank requirements must be met for any ranks earned as of April 1, 1999, or later.

Merit Badges and Awards

Each Rank above First Class requires that a Scout earn a minimum number of merit badges, including a specified minimum number of Eagle-required Merit Badges (twelve in all) in order to earn the rank. Many of these are offered by Troop Counselors on a scheduled basis during the year. Others are attainable at Camp Ajawah, Merit Badge Clinics, or on an individual basis from BSA Merit Badge Counselors. Announcements and sign ups for merit badge activities generally take place at Troop meetings.

All Scouts should comply with the following procedures for Merit Badge counseling. Your assistance in this will help maintain our standards and eliminate the possibility of disappointment to the boy.

To Qualify for a Merit Badge:

  1. The Scout selects a Merit Badge that interests him, or that is necessary for his next rank advancement.
  2. The Advancement Chairman or a Scoutmaster will assign a Merit Badge Counselor and furnish the merit badge card (sometimes called "blue card," although all are not blue) before beginning any work on the Merit Badge. Merit Badge Counselors are registered members of the Troop Committee, parents and/or other adults who have knowledge and experience in a particular area, and have registered with the Viking Council.
  3. In the case of merit badges offered by the Troop, it is not necessary to obtain the Scoutmaster's permission (and signature on the merit badge card) prior to starting work on the badge. In all other cases, a Scout should obtain the Scoutmaster's permission (and signature) before beginning.
  4. Coaching sessions and interim reporting, if required, continue between the Counselor and the Scout until the Counselor is satisfied that the Scout has completed all the requirements for the Merit Badge.
  5. The Counselor signs the Merit Badge application card. If the course is Troop offered, the Scout has the Scoutmaster (or Assistant Scoutmaster) sign the card. The Scout then returns the card to the Advancement Chairman for recording. Especially in the case of merit badges earned outside the Troop, a Scout should take care to safeguard the documentation he receives of his work; if lost, a Scout may have to repeat the work to earn the badge.
  6. At the next appropriate Court of Honor, the Scout will receive the Merit Badge and an achievement card.

The Scout Handbook lists currently available Merit Badges (over 125). For specific information, you should obtain a Merit Badge book (pamphlet) from the Troop library or Scout Shop, which gives details and step-by-step help on meeting the requirements of a particular Merit Badge. Also available at the Scout Shop is a handy "Boy Scout Requirements" book, which lists all the Merit Badges and their requirements.

Scoutmaster Conference and Board of Review

General:

Each advancement requires a Scoutmaster Conference and a Board of Review. At the Scoutmaster Conference, the Scoutmaster reviews the requirements for the rank and the Scout's performance of those requirements. This conference should establish a good working relationship between the Scout and the Scoutmaster of the Troop. It is an opportunity for the Scoutmaster to meet one on one with each Scout in order to set goals, discuss interests and communicate regarding the Scout's interaction with the Patrol and Troop. A Scoutmaster Conference is required for each rank advancement, and whenever requested by the Scoutmaster.

A Board of Review is conducted by a three-member panel composed of adult Troop Committee Members. Board of Review procedures follow the guidelines set forth by Boy Scouts of America. In the case of a Board of Review for Eagle, the District Advancement Chairman will designate a District Advancement Committee member to serve on the Board of Review. Final approval of all Eagle Awards is given only by the National Council, Boy Scouts of America.

In a Board of Review, the panel asks detailed questions to determine the quality of the Scout's experience. Other questions pertaining to "Scout Spirit," leadership abilities, service work or other aspects of Scouting are normal. A Board of Review is not a retest of the achievement requirements which have already been approved by the Scoutmaster.

Boards of Review and Scoutmaster conferences are scheduled usually for the first Monday meeting of the month. A Board of Review should be scheduled at least two weeks prior to each Court of Honor. It is the Scout's responsibility to arrange a time for both the Scoutmaster Conference and Board of Review. A Scout should present his handbook to the Advancement Chairman and verify that Troop records reflect his completion of all other necessary requirements, at the time the Scout requests the Advancement Chairman to schedule a Board of Review.

At the Board of Review & Scoutmaster Conferences:

The Scout must present himself at the scheduled time in FULL "CLASS A" UNIFORM with his Scout Handbook properly signed for the requirements for rank to which he is advancing.

Court of Honor

Advancement is recognized at a formal Troop Court of Honor held twice a year, once in December, and once in June. The Court of Honor provides an opportunity for Scouts to be acknowledged for their work. Families are strongly encouraged to attend as the Court of Honor is a special occasion and, in the case of Eagle, parents are asked to stand with their Scout as he receives his rank.

Troop 33 organizes two types of ceremonies to recognize advancement achievements: Court of Honor and "Eagle" Scout Court of Honor.

The Court of Honor addresses Merit Badges, General Information, Announcements, various Award Presentations, and Rank Advancements. The Court of Honor generally takes place in the Refrectory of Westminster Church. The calendar reflects the Court of Honor start times.

The "Eagle" Scout Court of Honor addresses Rank Advancements and the "Eagle" Scout Ceremony. It takes place in the Church Sanctuary. The Ceremony starts immediately following the Court of Honor. In order to give the Scouts the recognition they deserve, all family's are asked to stay for the Eagle Ceremony. A Scout's "Eagle" Scout Court of Honor date is determined by the date when all of a Candidate's paper work has been completed. A Scout who completes his rank in between scheduled Eagle Scout Court of Honor dates will be expect to wait until the next scheduled Eagle Scout Court of Honor to be honored for his achievement and publicly receive his rank award. Dates are reflected in the calendar, but are subject to change.

Contact any of the Committee Members with questions.

Tenderfoot Requirements

  1. Present yourself to your leader, properly dressed, before going on an overnight camping trip. Show the camping gear you will use. Show the right way to pack and carry it.
  2. Spend at least 1 night on a patrol or troop campout. Sleep in a tent you have helped pitch on a ground bed you have prepared.
  3. On the campout, assist in preparing and cooking one of your patrol's meals. Tell why it is important for each patrol member to share in meal preparation and cleanup, and explain the importance of eating together.
  4. Explain the rules of safe hiking, both on the highway and cross-country, during the day and at night. Explain what to do if you are lost.
  5. Demonstrate how to display, raise, lower, and fold the American flag.
  6. Repeat from memory and explain in your own words the Scout Oath, Law, motto and slogan.
  7. Know your patrol name, give the patrol yell, and describe your patrol flag.
  8. Explain why we use the buddy system in Scouting.
  9. Identify local poisonous plants; tell how to treat for exposure to them.
  10. Participate in a Scoutmaster conference with Scout's Patrol Asst. Scoutmaster.
  11. Board of review completed _________________

Second Class Requirements

  1. Participate in flag ceremony for your school, religious institution, chartered organization, community, or troop activity.
  2. Participate in an approved (minimum of 1 hour) service project.
  3. Identify or show evidence of at least 10 kinds of wild animals (birds, mammals, reptiles, fish, mollusks) found in your community.
  4. Tell what precautions must be taken for a safe swim.
  5. Participate in a school, community, or troop program on the dangers of using drugs, alcohol, and tobacco, and other practices that could be harmful to your health. Discuss your participation in the program with your family.
  6. Show Scout spirit.
  7. Participate in a Scoutmaster conference with Scout's Patrol Asst. Scoutmaster.
  8. Board of review completed. __________________.

* If you use a wheelchair or crutches, or if it is difficult for you to get around, you may substitute "trip" for "hike." ** This requirement may be waived by the Troop Committee for medical or safety reasons.

First Class Requirements

  1. Demonstrate how to find directions during the day and at night without using a compass.
  2. Using a compass, complete an orienteering course that covers at least 1 mile and requires measuring the height and/or width of designated items (tree, tower, canyon, ditch, etc.).
  3. Since joining, have participated in ten separate troop/patrol activities (other than troop/patrol meetings), three of which included camping overnight.
  4. Visit and discuss with a selected individual approved by your leader (elected official, judge, attorney, civil servant, principal, teacher) your constitutional rights and obligations as a U.S. citizen.
  5. Identify or show evidence of at least 10 kinds of native plants found in your community.
  6. Show Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath(Promise) and Scout Law in your everyday life.
  7. Participate in a Scoutmaster conference with Scout's Patrol Asst. Scoutmaster.
  8. Board of review completed ____________________.

* This requirement may be waived by the Troop Committee for medical or safety reasons.

Star/Life/Eagle

The ranks of Star, Life and Eagle require earning a certain number of merit badges, serving in a position of responsibility in the troop, and being of service to others. Of the more than 120 merit badges available, the following 12 are the required list* of merit badges for Eagle:

First Aid Citizenship in the Community
Citizenship in the Nation Citizenship in the World
Communications Personal Management
Environmental Science Personal Fitness
Camping Family Life
Emergency Preparedness OR Lifesaving
Cycling OR Swimming OR Sports
*Note: Changes to the list of Eagle required merit badges will be made effective as of January 1, 1999, with either the old or the new list effective until April 1, 1999. An explanation of changes will be published by the Troop at a later date.

STAR RANK

  1. Be active in your troop and patrol for at least 4 months as a First Class Scout.
  2. Demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law in your everyday life.
  3. Earn six merit badges including any four from the required list for Eagle.
  4. While a First Class Scout, take part in service projects totaling at least 6 hours of work. These projects must be approved by your Scoutmaster.
  5. While a First Class Scout, serve actively 4 months in one or more of the following positions of responsibility (or carry out a Scoutmaster-assigned leadership project to help the troop): patrol leader, senior patrol leader, assistant senior patrol leader, den chief, scribe, librarian, historian, quartermaster, bugler, chaplain aide, instructor, junior assistant Scoutmaster, troop guide.
  6. After reviewing readiness with the Patrol ASM, take part in a Scoutmaster conference with the Scoutmaster or his specially-designated ASM.
  7. Complete Board of Review.

LIFE RANK

  1. Be active in your troop and patrol for at least 6 months as a Star Scout.
  2. Demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law in your everyday life.
  3. Earn five more merit badges (so that you have 11 in all), including any three more from the required list for Eagle.
  4. While a Star Scout, take part in service projects totaling at least 6 hours of work. These projects must be approved by your Scoutmaster.
  5. While a Star Scout, serve actively for 6 months in one or more of the positions of responsibility (or carry out a Scoutmaster-assigned leadership project to help the troop): patrol leader, senior patrol leader, assistant senior patrol leader, den chief, scribe, librarian, historian, quartermaster, bugler, chaplain aide, instructor, junior assistant Scoutmaster, troop guide.
  6. After reviewing readiness, take part in a Scoutmaster conference with the Scoutmaster or his specially-designated ASM.
  7. Complete Board of Review.

EAGLE PROJECT REVIEW

The Troop Committee has delegated to the Eagle Project Review Committee, (appointed by the Troop Committee Chairman), the responsibility for working with each individual Eagle Scout candidate in determining the scope, nature, and process for establishing and executing his Eagle Scout project. This committee will work with the Advancement Chairman in order to be sure that projects meet the criteria of the BSA, as well as Troop 33. It is the objective of this review committee to assist the Scout, giving guidance and suggestions, as well as, ensuring the integrity of the Scout project.

EAGLE RANK

  1. Be active in your troop and patrol for at least 6 months as a Life Scout.
  2. Demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law in your everyday life.
  3. Earn a total of 21 merit badges (10 more than you already have), including 12 from the list of merit badges required for Eagle.
  4. While a Life Scout, serve actively for a period of 6 months in one or more of the following positions of responsibility: senior patrol leader, assistant senior patrol leader, chaplain aide, den chief, instructor, junior assistant Scoutmaster, librarian, patrol leader, quartermaster, scribe, senior patrol leader, troop guide.
  5. While a Life Scout, plan, develop, and give leadership to others in a service project helpful to any religious institution, any school, or your community. (The project should benefit an organization other than Boy Scouting.) The project idea must be approved by the organization benefiting from the effort, your Scoutmaster and Troop Committee, and by the council or district before you start. You must use the Eagle Scout Service Workbook in meeting this requirement.
  6. Take part in a Scoutmaster conference with the Scoutmaster or his specially-designated ASM.
  7. Complete Board of Review.

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